How Are Fireworks Made?

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Have you ever wondered just exactly how we get fireworks made? One can’t help but wonder how so much color, boom, crackle, and bang make its way into a comparably small packaging. Just think about it the next time you’re enjoying an elaborate display at a friend’s house or one of the many massive 4th of July shows.

Pyrotechnics is a fascinating subject that we could spend hours discussing. For brevity’s sake, we want to provide this quick primer on how manufacturers produce awesome fireworks like the ones you get at Black Cat.

Basic Stuff

There are actually hundreds of ways to make fireworks, but we’ll show you the most basic and comprehensible way to produce a reasonably powerful firework. Here are the steps for making a typical 500g cake item (but not at home!):

  1. First, put together all the tubes.
  2. Next, line out all the effects and fuse them together.
  3. Place inserts into each tube.
  4. Use a wooden dowel to ram down and secure the effects into the tubes.
  5. Attach fusing at the bottom.
  6. Wrap the entire cake with a label.
  7. Attach an outer fuse.
  8. Put it in a carton and ship it.

It’s important to remember that each tube is put together by hand and contains its own effects. This is nothing more than a very basic approach. The number of tubes, amount of powder, and complexity of effects are what account for the nearly limitless variation in the fireworks you see on the market today.

Making Fireworks Is Way More Sophisticated Nowadays

It’s really amazing to look back at how far the manufacturing process has evolved in just the past 10 years alone. Everything was made by hand not long ago. In the 21st century, manufacturers use a much more automated process.

This has been terrific for improving safety standards. It allows them to make fireworks in small, controllable batches, and pay closer attention to detail and quality. If you ever want to gain an even deeper knowledge of anything related to fireworks, we recommend checking out the Pyrotechnics Guild International (PGI) website. It’s a great way to avail yourself of the wealth of knowledge from many experienced firework experts.

Never Make Fireworks on Your Own

Attempting to make up your own fireworks is a recipe for disaster and illegal and we strongly discourage it. Black Cat has an extensive team of pyrotechnics experts and all sorts of control mechanisms to ensure that our products are safe to use. Especially when you consider all the laws and ordinances involving fireworks, it makes no sense for us to do anything else.

Again, never attempt to make your fireworks, and resist the temptation to modify them. Fireworks are precisely put together and you probably won’t be able to manipulate them without undue risk to yourself and anybody around you. There’s nothing safe about experimenting or tampering with fireworks.

How Fireworks Are Made. . . by the Best at Black Cat?

If you enjoyed this fun discussion on how fireworks are made, then you should check out our other content like these 8 interesting fireworks facts you probably don’t know. For example, a lot of folks don’t know that fireworks were once only made in China, were a lot more dangerous, and usually meant sticking things like sodium nitrate and charcoal into a bamboo shoot to do the job.

Things have come a LONG way since those days.

Now, you can count on much safer, better quality, tested, and more predictable products that won’t leave you with a ton of buyer’s remorse. Black Cat Fireworks has been in the business in some form or another since the 1940s, and we know every angle of rockets, fountains, firecrackers, spinners, Roman candles, and so much more.

Don’t hesitate to contact us for any kind of assistance.

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President & Co-Founder

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